What Are We
Looking At?

It’s no surprise to learn that university tuition fees in Canada have jumped an average of 3.1 per cent for undergraduate programs for the 2017-2018 academic years (Statistics Canada). The average tuition has increased to $6,571 from $6,375 in the 2016-2017 school year (Statistics Canada). These rising tuition costs deny access to many lower-income Canadians and leave others with “mortgage-sized” debt once they graduate. It makes one wonder: Is it worth it?

By exploring this site you will be armed with the data to help make this decision easier and get a better understanding of how the education system is functioning in Canada. Where is tuition rising? Do employment rates reflect the rise in tuition? Is it important to have a university degree?


You can start answering these questions by scrolling down to glance at the past 10 years of tuition fees.

Average Tuition ($) 2006
Average Tuition ($) 2011
Average Tuition ($) 2017

How do you stack up?

First you need to know how much Univeristy will cost you. Compare Tuition Prices by Province over 10 years with the interactive graph below.




Tuition Price Over 10 Years in Canada


Key Trends

$8,154

is the highest tutition price in 2016 found in Ontario. That is $1,781 above average.

$2,752

is the lowest tutition price in 2016 found in Newfoundland and Labrador. That is $3,621 below average.

So now we know how much it costs, but what are your odds of finding employment once you graduate?

Will you get a job?

Once you have graduated, what are you chances of finding employment? Compare Employment Rates by Province over 10 years with the interactive graph below. You can use the drop down menu to select a province.




Employment Rate of University Grad over 10 Years in Canada
Employment Rate (%) Year

Key Trends

92%

is the highest employment rate for Males in 2016 found in Saskatchewan.

88.7%

is the highest employment rate for Females in 2016 found in Newbrunswick.

87.7%

is the lowest employment rate for Males in 2016 found in Newfound Land.

81.4%

is the lowest employment rate for Females in 2016 found in Alberta.



What this means?
In general, the increase in tuition cost does NOT correlate to the change in employment rate by province. Just because you pay more doesn't mean that your chances of employment are better.

We also know that 70% of new jobs in Canada require some form of post-secondary education...

Employment Rate Based on Level of Education

The following graph compares the rate of employment based on level of education.

University evidently has the highest pay off in terms of employment rate. If you do decide to go to university, which areas of study provide the highest chance of employment?

Top 5 Areas of Study
Based on Employment Rate

The following is the top employment fields of study as of 2012 in Canada. Click Learn More to see a detailed breakdown of each area of study.

Learn More

Veterinary Medicine

Tuition Cost Per Year:
$7,667
Employment Rate:
99.7%
Income After 6 Months of Graduating:
$63,293
Income After 2 Years of Graduating:
$77,001

Learn More

Medicine

Tuition Cost Per Year:
$14,444
Employment Rate:
99.5%
Income After 6 Months of Graduating:
$59,323
Income After 2 Years of Graduating:
$71,123

Learn More

Pharmacy

Tuition Cost Per Year:
$10,279
Employment Rate:
98.7%
Income After 6 Months of Graduating:
$81,963
Income After 2 Years of Graduating:
$89,461

Learn More

Nursing

Tuition Cost Per Year:
$5,634
Employment Rate:
98.1%
Income After 6 Months of Graduating:
$56,839
Income After 2 Years of Graduating:
$61,745

Learn More

Business

Tuition Cost Per Year:
$7,068
Employment Rate:
96.1%
Income After 6 Months of Graduating:
$45,450
Income After 2 Years of Graduating:
$53,286

Is it worth it? You decide.